Lynda Mapes: Witness Tree and David B. Williams: Stories in Stone
Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019, 7 – 8:30 p.m.
Lynda Mapes: Witness Tree and David B. Williams: Stories in Stone
WhereCentral Library
Room LocationLevel 1 - Microsoft Auditorium
AudienceTeens, Adults
LanguageEnglish
SummaryJoin us for an exciting conversation with Lynda Mapes and David B. Williams, launching the paperback editions of Mapes’ Witness Tree and Williams’ Stories in Stone.
DescriptionSeasonal changes in nature are among the most readily observable clues to the biological effects of climate change. “It came to me,” writes acclaimed environment reporter Lynda Mapes, “You could tell the story of climate change—and more—through a single, beloved, living thing: a tree.” In Witness Tree: Seasons of Change with a Century-Old Oak, Mapes chronicles her yearlong quest to understand a wizened witness to our world: a red oak, over one hundred years old, in the Harvard Forest. A tree that has seen it all, from our changing relationship with nature in our industrialized and digitized lives to the altered clockwork of nature.

Lynda Mapes is the environmental reporter for the Seattle Times. She researched and wrote Witness Tree while a Knight Science Journalism fellow at MIT and a Bullard Fellow at the Harvard Forest. Her five books include Breaking Ground: The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and the Unearthing of Tse-whit-zen Village. She lives in Seattle.

Most people do not think to observe geology from the sidewalks of a major city, but all David B. Williams has to do is look at building stone in any urban center to find a range of rocks equal to any assembled by plate tectonics. In Stories in Stone: Travels through Urban Geology, he takes you on explorations to find 3.5-billion-year-old rock that looks like swirled pink-and-black taffy, a gas station made of petrified wood, and a Florida fort that has withstood three hundred years of attacks and hurricanes, despite being made of a stone that has the consistency of a granola bar.

David B. Williams is a freelance writer focused on the intersection of people and the natural world. He is the author or coauthor of six books, including Too High and Too Steep: Reshaping Seattle’s Topography and Cairns: Messengers in Stone. He lives in Seattle.
NotesLibrary events and programs are free and everyone is welcome. Registration is not required.

This program is presented in partnership with the University of Washington Press and Elliott Bay Book Company. Books will be available for purchase at the event.
PodcastThis event will be recorded for podcast.
Have a question?Ask Us
Contact Phone206-386-4636
Contact Info*Central Library
Room CapacitySpace is limited at library events. Please come early to make sure you get a seat. Due to the fire code, we can’t exceed the maximum capacity for our rooms.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
View CalendarPrint